Friday, September 21, 2007

The "Elenitas" Keep Multiplying

Since Cuban women have the world's highest suicide rate, it must naturally follow that they have the highest rate of mental illness as well. Another of the Revolution's real "achievements" as yet unreported by the MSM. In light of those statistics it should surprise no one that more "Elenitas" are waiting to have their cases adjudicated in Florida courts. The most similar of three cases involves another 5-year old girl with a mother in a psychiatric hospital here and an alcoholic father in Cuba. The girl is currently under the care of the mother's cousins in Miami, an even more striking parallel to the Elián case.

One of the Castro regime's attorneys defending Izquierdo, Steven Weinger, attempted to alert reporters to the existence of the other cases by mentioning these in open court, earning a sharp rebuke from Circuit Judge Jeri B. Cohen, the second she has merited in as many weeks. The first was for verbally harrassing an opposing lawyer with details of his private life. No doubt about it, there is no depth of wretchedness or illegality to which the Kurzban-Davis team will not sink; no dirty trick is beyond them; no underhanded ruse; no ethical violation. Already accused by their own witnesses of suborning perjury and obstruction of justice, the rest is simply the topping on the cake. It is doubtful, however, whether anything will be done about their gross professional misconduct. Judge Cohen has refused to sanction them or even to refer their cases to the bar association for disciplinary action.

The reason that Weinger was so anxious that the other cases be publicized was to create the impression that there was nothing special about this particular case. That it was, in fact, just another run-of-the-mill custody case with nothing to distinguish it from the rest but the fact that the principals were Cubans.

I frankly don't know why Weinger even bothered. Judge Cohen's decision to "leave politics out of the case" has in fact meant that those distinctions were never raised in her courtroom. The central fact of the case was never mentioned even once in the deliberations: the fact that this entire custody case is a personal vendetta undertaken by the Castro regime against Joe Cubas, its Number #1 enemy among Cuban exiles. Cubas has snatched dozens of Cuba's prized athletes from Castro's clutches and delivered them to freedom in America. Now it's Castro's chance to "get even" by stealing from Cubas his son's sister, whom he wishes to adopt as well. Rafael Izquierdo abandoned his daughter from the moment of birth, no, even before she was born, since the three-time bigamist asked the mother, Elena Pérez, to abort the baby. He's not the one who wants his daughter back for love's sake or even duty's sake. He never wanted any part of his daughter before she became his meal ticket. It's the regime that wants her so it can consummate its revenge on Joe Cubas.

There is nothing but politics to this case. To refuse to acknowledge that fact, to banish that fact from the courtroom, to erect that fact into some kind of bogeyman, is to subvert justice itself and become a tool of the enemies of the Rule of Law. It is, in fact, to transform an American courtroom into a Cuban one.

[Do not neglect to read the article that follows for more insights on this case, which is expected to be decided today].

2 comments:

Charlie Bravo said...

The case is all about politics, that is, to please the political corpse next door down south.
So, if they want to keep politics out of the courthouse the only thing to do is to throw the case and let the girl go home with whom she recognizes as parents, the Cubas.

Vana said...

I cannot believe this trial is still going on, this is not rocket science, if it were any other case, it would have lasted two or three days at the most, if I were not Cuban I would still believe this child should go to the Cubas, it is so obvious that Izquierdo is an unfit father, much as OJ, he signed her away to a crazy woman, that would be enough for me if I were a judge