Sunday, August 19, 2007

A Crash of Titans and the Truth Prevails

Those who missed yesterday's epic fight between Enrique Rubio (aka fantomas & Longfellow) and Alex Hernández (aka "Ya No Más"), which the latter won by knock-out and left fantomas literally crying "¡No más!", can view it at your pleasure by visiting the Madhouse for the Stupid and Obnoxious, where it's playing 24-hours a day for an unlimited engagement. Scroll down to the bottom of the 200+ comments (a long and interesting trek). Never a dull minute (except when fantomas is holding court). Not recommended for those with week stomachs and faint hearts. Can you cut it in The Madhouse? We'll see.

14 comments:

Fantomas said...
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Fantomas said...
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Fantomas said...
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Manuel A.Tellechea said...

fantomas:

crash: a breaking to pieces by or as if by a collision.

You can, however, enlighten me on the meaning of "neen."

Fantomas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Vana said...

"Neen" Lmao, wow the man that claimed he never Cussed is cussing a mile a minute, will wonders never cease! see Manuel we cannot believe a word he says, I don't think he even knows what he's talking about, he needs his medication

Vana said...

Well looky here, the coward deleted all his comments, dusturbed I tell you

Fantomas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Fantomas said...

get to know the real manuel tellechea

che che chea wanting cuba to be a banana republic and making fun of DR Darsi

here is the proof

soon I will bring devastating news...Peee Wee (me ) vs longjohnfellow... para que no quede duda that we are the same person

good thing oscar corral just sent me this past postings..thanks oscar

...............................
His name is Dr Darsi Ferrer. He wants his name out there . He is not afraid to be in the public eye. He is calling for peaceful demonstrations (starting sunday 13th birthdate of the dictator) all over the island and has warned the military not to shoot at them-

Will Cubans listen to his call . He is a very courageus man.

Posted by: Pee Wee Herman | August 11, 2006 at 11:47 AM

Poor Cuban parents! They can't give their children anything so they invent bizarre names for them. Like Darsi. Or Elián. And worse, much worse.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 11, 2006 at 12:02 PM

Fantomas said...

SEñores aqui esta la prueba..lean bien esto no tiene perdida...sorry vana tus heroes han sido descubiertos ..i got much more ...En ese blog yo firmaba como pee wee y miren como yo hablaba de longfellow ...una persona despreciable en todos los sentidos...sorry manuel you have neen corrected and served by fantomas again

Message received in my inbox 2 minutes ago witten by DR Darsi Ferrer from Cuba

Compatriotas
Por temor a perjudicarnos no podemos continuar vasallos.
LLegó el momento de asumir con dignidad el desafío de reconstruir nuestra nación,
El cambio depende de nosotros y está en cada uno de nosotros.
Controlemos el miedo.
Para Cuba:
LIBERTAD, DEMOCRACIA Y AMOR.

Un fuerte abrazo,
Darsi
__________________________________
This guy is a hero. Me cago en la madre del que hable mal de el, coño ,fuck you

Posted by: Pee Wee Herman | August 11, 2006 at 03:17 PM

Dr. Dacsi Ferrer is a hero, it's only these unemployed actors playing politics that deserve to live in Fidel's Cuba.

Posted by: a different thought | August 11, 2006 at 05:47 PM

You know how it is with hollywood , once you make a mistake they never forgive.

In regards to the so called politiqueros that write
in this forums , I say the same thing .what have they done for Cuba lately?

Again la madre y la abuela de quien mencione el nombre de el Dr Darsi in vain

Fuck you again , just in case

Posted by: Pee Wee Herman | August 11, 2006 at 06:18 PM


Start talking to Cuba
The New York Times
FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 2006
President George W. Bush and his top aides have said repeatedly in recent days that they haven't a clue what's going on inside Cuba. With Fidel Castro's health faltering, they need to start figuring it out.

Cuba is a closed, repressive society. But the Bush administration has gone out of its way to ensure that the United States has neither access nor the slightest chance to influence events there.

In the name of tightening the failed embargo - a bipartisan policy for more than four decades - Bush has made it much harder for academics, artists, religious people and anyone else who might spread the good word about America to travel to Cuba - and much harder for Cubans to travel to the United States.

President Hugo Chávez of Venezuela, a would-be Castro, has helped Cuba make up any lost cash with cheap oil exports. And Cuban officials who might be tempted to the side of reform have been given more reason to believe Castro's claims of unremitting American hostility.

In the same cut-off-your-nose spirit, the Bush administration canceled migration talks with Havana - intended to prevent a repeat of earlier boatlifts - that were the only regular high-level sit-downs between the two governments. American diplomats in Havana know their wisest career path is to keep their contacts to the bare minimum.

None of this made much sense when it looked like Castro would outlast yet another American president. It makes no sense at all now that it's clear his days are numbered.

The White House is understandably nervous that roiling in Cuba could set off a large flow of refugees. It is considering ways to speed up admission of family members while punishing those who try to jump the queue. It also needs to revive migration talks so the governments can coordinate a humane response should those warnings go unheeded.

The administration has moderated its rhetoric, recognizing that it's up to Cubans on the island to decide their future. But if Bush wants to get the message of democracy across he should loosen restrictions on cultural and academic exchanges and allow serious diplomatic contacts.

U.S. law blocks Bush from doing more even if Castro's successor, his brother Raúl, shows signs of moderation. Bush should tell Congress now that he doesn't want his hands tied that way.

No one knows when Castro will go or whether it will be with a bang or a whimper. But the policies of self-isolation will ensure that the United States is the last to know when big things happen - and will have no one in Cuba to talk to when they do.

Posted by: another view | August 11, 2006 at 10:28 PM

Hey Pee Wee,
It's me, the Gay Avenger, who has come out of the closet. Sorry I had to use your name to get back at John Longfellow aka Lou Dobbs, but as you can see, I drove him off this blog. He went hysterical thinking that you were Val Prieto or Henry Gomez. If Longfellow shows up again, I will NAMBLA him all the way back to the insane asylum.

Posted by: The Gay Avenger | August 11, 2006 at 10:42 PM

Another View:

You are obviously in perfect agreement with The Times editorial, except for one little thing:

"Cuba is a closed, repressive society."

Would you sign your name to that, too?

So long as you continue to support the Cuban regime from the comfort of your ivory tower, your "cut and paste" jobs will not influence anyone here.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 11, 2006 at 11:03 PM

I am glad Johnlennonfellow caca lou dobbs
is out of here..

We can now concentrate in issues like

Blasting fidel an his Tailban gangs,

reconstruction for Cuba

Ways to better the education of a new cuba

Ways to burn all the communists books from inside cuba's school system..

We need to change so many things...

Supress la libreta de abastecimiento for good...

En fin lets talk about the real issues, please folks dont waste your time in Hillary Clinton, George Bush or Al Gore

lets talk about what will happen to florida , after castro is gone...

Will the cuban ex convicts be deported to cuba as promised by the Justice Dept?

Will Elian Gonzales able to comeback to the US? ( with his father)

folks , we have thousands of small claims issues to discuss

lets begin now, since Oscar dont write new posts anymore

Is it possible that Oscar and fellowjohn are the same person?

is that possible?

both are missing

Posted by: Pee Wee Herman | August 12, 2006 at 01:16 AM

I am not Pee Wee Herman. Someone is posting under that handle but it's not me.

And on an unrelated note I agree with all of you about renegade actors with in your face political propaganda. If I wanted to hear political commentary I'd listen to someone who actually has a clue, not some overpaid fucktard who plays in pretendland all day. Tom Cruise, Angelina Jolie, and The Dixie Chicks (yes I know they're musicians not actors) are particularly galling. So much so that I'll go out of my way not to pay to see their shit just to spite them.


Posted by: Juan (Pancho) Valquez | August 12, 2006 at 01:36 AM

Video Reveals Crude Behavior by Castro's Brother

By Nancy San Martin

McClatchy Newspapers

MIAMI - In one scene, Cuban Defense Minister and interim leader Raul Castro holds up a bar of soap in the shape of breasts and, after taking a sniff, remarks how good it would be if all women "had them like this."

In another, he pokes fun at former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev. And in a third he ogles a uniformed female marine and then tells how, as a child, he was sexually aroused after peering at a girl through a window.

The crude behavior is no parody. They are snippets of a video shot in 1992 by an unidentified U.S. physician and broadcast by several Miami stations in the 1990s. It is currently being re-broadcast by Miami's Spanish-language WJAN-TV, America TeVe.

At one point in the video, when the physician tries to take on a more serious tone, Castro says, "If we didn't take things lightly, we would die of bitterness."

The unusual footage offers a peek into the private side of a 75-year-old revolutionary leader who has headed Cuba's military for 47 years and now temporarily controls the island's future as older brother Fidel Castro recuperates from gastrointestinal surgery.

"This is a side of him few people see," said Miguel Cossio, the station's news director. "He hardly ever comes out in public and speaks even less."

"People are discovering a Raul Castro they did not know - the real Raul," Cossio added.

The station would not reveal the name of the doctor or the circumstances surrounding his unusual access to Castro. But Cossio said Cuban officials have never challenged the video's authenticity.

"The video is real," he said.

Since the Castro brothers began plotting their revolution in the early 1950s, Raul has operated in his older brother's shadow. He has often been described as an avowed Communist and ruthless leader with the organizational skills of a perfectionist.

But he also has been described as an engaging and easy-going family man who loves to tell jokes, as well as a heavy drinker who sometimes goes over the line of good taste, especially when drunk. Cuban humor often can be crass, but rarely publicly displayed by high-level officials.

In the footage, dated Feb. 9, 1992 and filmed with a video camera that was not hidden, Raul Castro does not appear inebriated. But within about 25 minutes of film, there are at least eight instances of behavior befitting a comedian, not a statesman.

The film starts at an office and moves through a visit to several military installations, including an underground facility used to store tanks.

In one exchange, Castro opens a gift of a bar of soap in the shape of a heart with breasts. He smiles, holds the soap to his face and takes in a deep breath.

"If all women had them like this, it would be very good," he says with a chuckle, adding that he must keep the gift away from his grandson, otherwise the boy "would take it and start touching the little breasts."

Later in the video, Castro tells the American that he resembles former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.

"But you are better than Gorbachev," Castro says. "You are capable of opening someone's chest, changing his heart and keep him living. Gorbachev made the heart of the Soviet Union change and killed it."

When the physician jokingly challenges Castro about the number of Cuban generals, saying that he had heard that if one drills for oil in Cuba a general pops up, Castro retorts with a joke of his own. "Or a mulatta," he says.

Shortly afterwards, as a unit of female troops marches past Castro in a formal ceremony, the defense minister chases after the unit and reaches over to tap her face from behind.

"Now, this is a good unit to be part of."

He goes on to tell a lengthy story about having to confess to a priest while he was a youngster studying in an all-boys Catholic school. Castro said that he told the priest that he had looked through a window, saw a girl and had "bad thoughts."

"What else?" Castro said the priest asked him. "Well father, that night, you know, I masturbated."

Castro doubled over in laughter at his own joke. Then he turned to one of the Cuban military officers around him and said the male members of the unit were lucky: "They have girls here. They don't have to masturbate."

Cuba experts said the crude behavior might raise questions about Raul Castro's ability to rule Cuba in the absence of his brother Fidel.

"Raul is the provisional leader of Cuba," said Andy Gomez, a senior fellow at the University of Miami's Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies. "Is he capable of handling that leadership? That's a big question."

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 12, 2006 at 07:05 AM

The video was made by Fidel Castro's American-born cardiologist, who resides in Bergen County, N.J.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 12, 2006 at 08:40 AM

...Ways to burn all the communists books from inside cuba's school system...

Why does it always seem productive to burn and suppress information...What do you think makes this country so great. The fact that I can pick up a Karl Marxx book anytime I feel like it and digest the deepest ramblings of another person. I guess you will also run a post Castro Cuba with either a fabricated history between 1959-?? or completely suppress it and tell your children those were the dark ages.

People suppress and burning books is never the answer!!!


Posted by: Boricua | August 12, 2006 at 10:31 AM

John Longfellow has finally embraced his Puerto Rican roots and returned to us as "Boricua" (see above).

I congratulate him on this moment of self-realization and hope that henceforth he will always be motivated by the generous and noble spirit of his people.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 12, 2006 at 11:59 AM

I congratulate him on this moment of self-realization and hope that henceforth he will always be motivated by the generous and noble spirit of his people

I detect a bit of sarcasm in this post, but then again maybe you're referring to the selfless and brave contributions Puerto Ricans gave the Cuban people during the struggle for independence against Spain or did you forget that Puerto Rico was also under the Spanish throne.

Posted by: Boricua | August 12, 2006 at 12:04 PM

I say lets burn all the communist propaganda
left in Cuba after Castro dies..

By the way borinqueño, we are not going to engage in talking about PR here.

the name says it all .. Cuban Connection..

We have to change so many things in Cuba, the entire school curriculim and textbooks WILL BE BURN AS SONN AS CASTRO DIES.

why? Because you are telling lies. As a Cuban studen mysekf in the 70's I can recall how the changed history blatanly..
Like who went to the moon first, YURI Gagarin or the Americans, they omitted any references about Us history to us kids, and changed it soviet style..
this is why they need to be burn, same as all museums , portrays , movies about castro and the revolution, it has to be done as in Iraq and the same way the soviet Union did.
You are right future generations will only refer to the 1959 period as the darkest moment in cuban history, only emphazazing in one name fidel castro and explaining the kids at school that that dictator, beast of a man was the responsible for the destruction of the republic of cuba

nuff said

Posted by: Pee Wee Herman | August 12, 2006 at 02:41 PM

Juan pancho

Who the fuck are you, man?

el que escribe bajo pee wee es el mismo
de siempre el real, el que odia ( pero extraña) a jaun largo caca dobbs...

oye, yo no me cambio de nombre nunca , yo posteo under that name siempre. Asi que listo for the battle vamos a talkt about post cuba, coño..

Dime que debemos hacer with all the museamus y con el cuartel moncada en Santiago de cuba...

yo digo vamos a destruir eso y construir tremendos casinos , hoteles, villas, almacenes, cines, escuelas, tiendas , en esos terrenos...

tenemos que enterrar POR COMPLETO los 47 años de dictadura..

acaso queda alguna estatua o museo abierto por ahi de Somoza, hitler, mussolini, Duvalier, Franco...

Espero que no.....

Posted by: Pee Wee Herman | August 12, 2006 at 02:51 PM

CUBA, I REMEMBER YOU/CUBA, TE RECUERDO
By OSCAR M. RAMÍREZ-ORBEA, PH.D.

**Cuba, I Remember You is a book about family, love, relationships, and survival in difficult circumstances that all readers will find to be a wonderful reading experience.

Bettie Corbin Tucker
For IP Book Reviewers
Independent Professional Reviewers

See more about the book at:
http://cubairememberyou.zoomshare.com/

CUBA, I REMEMBER YOU/CUBA, TE RECUERDO
A collection of 14 short stories, all in Spanish and English, based on the author’s experiences of childhood before and after the Communist revolution. Includes Appendix for educators wishing to use the book in Spanish or English foreign language classes. Lots of nostalgia for those who knew Cuba in the 50’s and 60’s and plenty of humor for readers in general. Includes also many period family photographs that illustrate the stories and bring them vividly to life!

About the Author
Dr. Oscar M. Ramírez-Orbea, was born in Camagüey, Cuba, in 1955. He emigrated with his family to the US in 1966, after completing elementary school in his home country. He longs one day to return to his native city of Camagüey and to all the fond memories it holds for him. CUBA, I REMEMBER YOU/CUBA, TE RECUERDO is Dr. Ramírez’s first narrative work.

Available now from Airleaf Publishing (www.airleaf.com) or call today to order your copy at 1-800-342–6068.

§ Product Details
§ Paperback: 392 pages
§ Publisher: Airleaf Publishing; 1st edition (January 10, 2006)
§ Language: English, Spanish
§ ISBN: 1594539553

New work by the same author, published and in bookstores by winter of 2007:

Cuba, Between History and Legend
A collection of short stories based on Cuban legends and unusual histories, all told in thoroughly original and creative ways. All stories are narrated in English and Spanish on facing pages. Includes also substantial background information on the actual events on which the stories are based, as well as references for follow-up reading, and historical illustrations for all the stories. For brief descriptions of the stories, go to www.cubairememberyou.zoomshare.com On the market by year’s end. Cuba … like you’ve never read it before!

Por el mismo autor:

Cuba, Entre la Historia y la Leyenda
Una colección de cuentos cortos basados en leyendas cubanas y en eventos insólitos de la historia de Cuba, todos narrados en un estilo originalísimo y de gran fantasía. Se narran todos los cuentos en inglés y en español, en páginas opuestas. Incluye considerable información adicional sobre el fondo histórico de cada cuento, al igual que sugerencias para otras lecturas sobre la misma temática, y se incluyen ilustraciones históricas de cada uno de los cuentos. Para leer breves descripciones de cada cuento, favor de dirgirse a www.cubairememberyou.zoomshare.com En venta hacia finales del año. Cuba ¡como nunca te la imaginaste!




Posted by: Felix | August 12, 2006 at 04:50 PM

CUBA, I REMEMBER YOU/CUBA, TE RECUERDO
By OSCAR M. RAMÍREZ-ORBEA, PH.D.

**Cuba, I Remember You is a book about family, love, relationships, and survival in difficult circumstances that all readers will find to be a wonderful reading experience.

Bettie Corbin Tucker
For IP Book Reviewers
Independent Professional Reviewers

See more about the book at:
http://cubairememberyou.zoomshare.com/

CUBA, I REMEMBER YOU/CUBA, TE RECUERDO
A collection of 14 short stories, all in Spanish and English, based on the author’s experiences of childhood before and after the Communist revolution. Includes Appendix for educators wishing to use the book in Spanish or English foreign language classes. Lots of nostalgia for those who knew Cuba in the 50’s and 60’s and plenty of humor for readers in general. Includes also many period family photographs that illustrate the stories and bring them vividly to life!

About the Author
Dr. Oscar M. Ramírez-Orbea, was born in Camagüey, Cuba, in 1955. He emigrated with his family to the US in 1966, after completing elementary school in his home country. He longs one day to return to his native city of Camagüey and to all the fond memories it holds for him. CUBA, I REMEMBER YOU/CUBA, TE RECUERDO is Dr. Ramírez’s first narrative work.

Available now from Airleaf Publishing (www.airleaf.com) or call today to order your copy at 1-800-342–6068.

§ Product Details
§ Paperback: 392 pages
§ Publisher: Airleaf Publishing; 1st edition (January 10, 2006)
§ Language: English, Spanish
§ ISBN: 1594539553

New work by the same author, published and in bookstores by winter of 2007:

Cuba, Between History and Legend
A collection of short stories based on Cuban legends and unusual histories, all told in thoroughly original and creative ways. All stories are narrated in English and Spanish on facing pages. Includes also substantial background information on the actual events on which the stories are based, as well as references for follow-up reading, and historical illustrations for all the stories. For brief descriptions of the stories, go to www.cubairememberyou.zoomshare.com On the market by year’s end. Cuba … like you’ve never read it before!

Por el mismo autor:

Cuba, Entre la Historia y la Leyenda
Una colección de cuentos cortos basados en leyendas cubanas y en eventos insólitos de la historia de Cuba, todos narrados en un estilo originalísimo y de gran fantasía. Se narran todos los cuentos en inglés y en español, en páginas opuestas. Incluye considerable información adicional sobre el fondo histórico de cada cuento, al igual que sugerencias para otras lecturas sobre la misma temática, y se incluyen ilustraciones históricas de cada uno de los cuentos. Para leer breves descripciones de cada cuento, favor de dirgirse a www.cubairememberyou.zoomshare.com En venta hacia finales del año. Cuba ¡como nunca te la imaginaste!




Posted by: Felix | August 12, 2006 at 04:51 PM

Pee Wee, Pancho, John or Whomever:

You are entirely right.

This is a subject that I have long considered (and I have had a long life in which to consider it).

In a post-Castro Cuba, all traces of this shameful period in our history must be eradicated. "Eradicated" is the right word and no other. We must literally uproot this poisonous weed so that it will never grow again.

Let's start at the beginning of this evil: Castro's homestead (now a museum). It must be razed to the ground and burnt to the last splinter as must all its contents. The land where it stood must be mixed with hundreds of metric tons of salt so that nothing will ever grow there again.

The yacht "Granma," which is now displayed in a glass case in front of the former Presidential Palace, as well as all the artifacts and displays in the "Museum of the Revolution," which is installed there, must also be incinerated.

The mausoleum built for "Che" Guevara must be dismantled and his remains disintegrated in lye (if there are really any remains at all).

The body of Blas Roca, the Batista-era labor leader and Soviet spy, must be removed from its current burial place beside Antonio Maceo, where Castro's infinite malice planted him.

Likewise, the remains of all Castro-era military officers must be removed from the "Veterans Pantheon" at Colon Cemetery, which was formerly reserved for our glorious mambises.

All statues to the "heroes" of the Revolution must be toppled and their names erased from all public buildings.

And if they bury Castro in Marti's Mausoleum, as seems likely, it will the first task of the new democratic Cuban government to built Marti a new and grander mausoleum, for his remains must not be allowed to remain in that desecrated place.

There, at least, is a start.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 12, 2006 at 05:42 PM

I am not Pee Wee or Lou Dobbs. I am Pancho and I don't hate foreigners. At least not the legal ones.

Destroying everything Castro seems a little extreme. Even the Germans kept some Nazi stuff around that remains to this day and serves as a tourist attraction. Like it or not Castro and communism is a part of Cuban history now, just as much as Spanish colonial rule was. The people in Cuba will have to decide how to deal w/a post Castro Cuba and no one else.

Posted by: Juan (Pancho) Valquez | August 12, 2006 at 08:51 PM

Felix - cuantas veces vas a poner tu anuncio? Ya lo hemos visto chico. Tranquilo.

Posted by: juan pachanga | August 12, 2006 at 09:27 PM

Pancho:

Actually, this is my liberal De-Castrification Plan.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 12, 2006 at 09:45 PM

Castro's successor may not be a Cuban

By Gwynne Dyer
August 10, 2006

'Are revolutions doomed to fail" asked Fidel Castro last November,
addressing an audience of university students in a five-hour speech
that was followed by a question-and- answer session that lasted until
dawn. "When the veterans start disappearing, to make room for new
generations of leaders, what will be done? Can the revolutionary
process be made irreversible? "

Those questions haunt Cubans now, as the 79-year-old Maximum Leader
recovers from surgery for "intestinal bleeding", having temporarily
handed power to his designated successor, his brother Raul. Some
Cubans desperately hope that Fidel will survive; others hope just as
strongly that he and his revolution will pass away. But the only
people in a position to affect the outcome are the senior officials
of the Cuban Communist Party. None of their alternatives is ideal.

Raul is not a long-term option: he is too old (75), and suffers from
a drastic lack of charisma. There is a younger generation of
dedicated Communists, people such as Vice-President Carlos Lage
Davila and Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque, but they aren't
exactly pop stars either. For almost half a century Cubans have been
incited, flattered, thrilled and scolded by the incendiary rhetoric
of the 20th century's most articulate revolutionary. He is a hard act
to follow.

But there is Hugo Chavez. Chavez's drawbacks as a replacement for
Fidel Castro are obvious: he is the President of another country,
Venezuela, and he is not a communist. On the other hand, he is a
tireless revolutionary orator in the Castro mode, he is the right
racial mixture to appeal to the downtrodden in many Latin American
countries - and he does have money. With oil at its present
near-record price, about $A263 million in oil revenues is flowing
into Caracas every day (half of it from the United States), and
Chavez has already proved generous to his friends.

The Communist bosses would expect to go on making the real decisions
in Cuba, of course. As hardened masters of the dialectic, they are
bound to see Chavez as a naive, impulsive romantic. But a formal
merger of the two countries, rather along the lines of the "United
Arab Republic" that Egypt's Gamal Abdul Nasser once declared with
Syria, would have major advantages for a beleaguered post-Castro
Communist regime in Havana.

The Cuban Communists fear indirect or even direct US interference in
the country to destabilise the regime after Fidel's departure. They
worry out loud about the loyalty of a younger generation whose
nationalism (which in Castro's Cuba means anti-Americanism) is at war
with its urgent desire for access to all the pleasures of
consumerism. They worry more quietly about the millions of Cubans who
really would like to see democracy in their country. Plenty of
reasons, then, to consider the Chavez option.

A formal link between Cuba and Venezuela, with Chavez as joint
president, would give the regime in Havana new ideological impetus by
appealing to the old Bolivarian dream of a unified Latin America. It
would give Cuba more access to Venezuelan oil, Venezuelan financial
aid, and perhaps even the modern arms that Venezuela is now buying
from Russia.

Chavez would be a sucker for such a proposal, partly because it would
appeal to his own Bolivarian dreams and partly because it would drive
the US Government crazy. As he said last year at a meeting of the
Joint Commission on the Comprehensive Co-operation Agreement Between
Cuba and Venezuela, "Cuba and Venezuela have joined together, and at
this point, the world should know that our fate is sealed, that these
two homelands, which deep down are one, are opening a new road at
whatever cost."

It isn't just a pipe dream. The first person to suggest in public
that the Cuban regime might be seriously considering such a union was
Ana Faya, now a senior analyst at the Canadian Foundation for Latin
America in Ottawa, but for 10 years, until she fled to Canada in
2000, an official of the Central Committee of the Cuban Communist
Party. "It wouldn't be outrageous," she said last October. "(But) it
should take place while (Fidel) Castro is still in charge."

If she is right, it will now have become an urgent priority in
Havana.

Gwynne Dyer is a London-based independent journalist

Posted by: another view | August 12, 2006 at 10:15 PM

Think of Cuba as a whole nation full of Prince Charles'. That is, men in their late fifties and sixties who have been waiting their turn to rule for 30 years. Do you think that they will gladly surrender their last chance to the Venezuelan gnome?

Then, there's that little problem of Venezuelans and Cubans not liking each other.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 12, 2006 at 11:02 PM

Then, there's that little problem of Venezuelans and Cubans not liking each other.

And here I thought it was just Cubans and Puerto Ricans not liking each other.

Manuel, if that's your liberal for De-Castrofication, Post-Castro Cuba should actually fear YOU!!!

You say Iraq did it, that's why Iraqis are where they are and you will never progress unless you truly adopt US style free thinking.


Posted by: Boricua | August 12, 2006 at 11:20 PM

Feliz Cumpleano a ti, feliz cumpleano a ti, feliz cumpleano Commandante, feliz cumpleano a ti.

Posted by: Karl Marxx | August 12, 2006 at 11:27 PM

Boricua:

As a matter of fact, Cubans and Puerto Ricans like each other a great deal. A survey recently revealed that it is the fondest wish of Puerto Rican parents on the island that their children marry Cubans.

This is not in the least surprising, since as the great Puerto Rican poet Lola Rodríguez de Tió wrote:

"Cuba and Puerto Rico share
A bird's wings, and cannot part:
Flowers and bullets they bear
Upon the very same heart"

In fact, I regard only Puerto Ricans and Dominicans as brothers. The rest of Latin America are, at most, our cousins.


Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 13, 2006 at 12:27 AM

80 Years of hell

Cuba cries today

www.abajofidel.blogspot.com

Posted by: Enrique | August 13, 2006 at 02:41 AM

Manuel..those who ignore the past or try to eradicate it suffer the likelihood that they will re-live it. Let's not destroy those things, let's put them in a Museum to as a constant reminder to us of Cuba's dark days, maybe that way, we will never repeat those lessons.

Posted by: a different thought | August 13, 2006 at 07:51 AM

A.T.:

They filled-in Hitler's bunker, didn't they?

In fact, in Germany it is illegal to praise Hitler or to frame his picture, or to own Nazi propaganda (let alone distribute it).

What would you have us do? Put Castro's uniform on display in a museum?

We should built memorials to Castro's victims, hundreds and thousands of them. It is this which will help us never to forget.


Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 13, 2006 at 08:06 AM

That last post should have beern addressed to ADT, not AT.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 13, 2006 at 08:07 AM

"Juventud Rebelde" has just published post-operative photographs of Fidel in a red and white Adidas jumpsuit, looking better than he has in 10 years. Not only does he seem to have put on a few extra pounds, but his predominently white beard is now predominently black. The wonders of Cuban medicine!

Time for CIA analysts to start comparing the moles and age spots seen in the last pre-operative photographs of Castro to those in this set of post-operative ones.

Also whether he has ever worn this Adidas jumpsuit in previous photos and exactly when this particular style was was manufactored.

A lot of questions must be answered before we can be sure that the devil has come back to Cuba.

And by the way, I hear all the young people in Cuba are wearing Adidas jumpsuits.


Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 13, 2006 at 08:53 AM

When my parents went to Germany and asked a some British officers to see where the infamous bunker was, they told them that it was gone and they had no idea where it was. Germany, for the most part, wants to forget about the evil that they unleashed on the world.

It is correct to say that we cannot write Castro out of history books. That's akin to people wanting to say the Holocaust never happened or slavery was exaggerated. You must write about Castro and present him as he is: a monstrous assasin of humanity. We need to ensure future generations will never tolerate a dictatorship like his again, but I don't think we need a museum dedicated to this jackal. There is no museum to Hitler; there should be no museum to Castro. But, then again, someone would probably burn it down.

However, from what I see, the island stays quiet and the dissidents are probably left out on a limb. Where are the demonstrations? Where are the cries for liberty that should be emanating from La Habana? Where are the shouts for the Americans to help? Where's all that Cuban swagger that I see daily around the streets of Miami? The minute they're on 8th Street, they become very brave and start talking about how Castro has to go. But when they were on the island, ni un pio. Whatever.

By the way, nice Adidas track suit that Fidel was wearing in that highly-suspect picture on the front of the paper today. He looks better than he has in years; the Clairol is doing wonders. Did his family from Miami send the track suit?

Posted by: a thought.... | August 13, 2006 at 06:04 PM

I stand by my viewpoint. I'm not saying keep things the way they are....I'm saying remember the horror. Are there not museums and memorials dedicated to those who fell in Hitler's holocaust everywhere? Eradication means that, and I think we have to memorialize the horror and failure of that system which ocurred all at the whim of a meglomaniacal dictator who disrespected the process, and therefore the people.

Posted by: a different thought | August 13, 2006 at 06:30 PM

I never implied to eradicate any museum dedicated to the Holocaust; I just have a problem with a museum dedicated to Hitler or Castro or any other monster that humanity produced.

By the way, do they have Photoshop in Cuba? Some of those Castro pictures look....suspect. To say the least...

Posted by: a thought... | August 13, 2006 at 11:26 PM

Pee Wee,
Your nemesis John Longfellow aka Lou Dobbs is still recuperating from his sex change surgery. His anus is still his vagina.

Posted by: The Gay Avenger | August 14, 2006 at 12:39 AM

As soon as John longfellow reappears

I wiil be ready to blast him again...

By the way, I would like to ask him if

fidel photos are doctored or not?

Thanks maricon avenger

Posted by: Pee Wee Herman | August 14, 2006 at 02:40 AM

Nuevas photos de Castro vivito y coleando

Sera posible, la muerte le tiene miedo a fidel

www.abajofidel.blogspot.com

Posted by: Enrique | August 14, 2006 at 07:21 AM

Eureka!!!

Look at the Castro photos, look at them intently, don't try to analyze anything, just look good and hard.

Keep doing this till it finally dawns on you as it dawned on me — its a wax dummy.
The quasi-smile in one of the photographs gives it away. No such smile has ever been seen in Nature.

Case solved.

Next.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 14, 2006 at 08:32 AM

Madame Toussard's from London called....

Posted by: a thought... | August 14, 2006 at 08:41 AM

Oscar:

Well, Fidel has now been seen (supposedly) and so has Raul. It's only Oscar who's now missing in action.

Are the Cuban-American kids still gathering at the beach for their protest? It's been 11 days. Are they setting a Guinness record?

Time for a change of topic.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 14, 2006 at 08:58 AM

Not that I am going to post long articles like another view does, but this one again reflects common sense and rational thinking, something that our policy with Cuba lacks -

Opportunity knocks for redemption in Cuba
Roanoke Times, VA - August 13

The U.S. economic embargo against Cuba hasn't worked. Its days should be numbered.

Once adept at winning hearts and minds worldwide, the U.S. and its cowboy president regularly strike the world today as black hat bad guys. Now, though, there's a white Stetson hanging on a Caribbean peg and it's within reach.

Fate has offered up in Cuba an opportunity for Bush to be a healer instead of a chaos dealer.

But evidence to date suggests the president and Congress will pass up a shot at limited redemption.

Bush is talking about the nation's plan to help foster democracy in Cuba. Considering his pledge to do the same for Iraqis, such rhetoric might just raise the hair on the back of many Cubans' necks.

In July, before news of Fidel Castro's illness, the president signed off on a Free Cuba commission's recommendation to "improve enforcement of existing sanctions to maintain economic pressure on the regime to limit its ability to sustain itself and repress the Cuban people."

Bad idea.

Bush cannot be blamed for the nation's 43-year-old economic embargo against Cuba. Vote-hungry politicians have routinely pandered to hard-liner Cuban exiles in Florida. Most exiles favor the embargo; for younger generations of Cuban-Americans the issue is less clear.

First issued by the U.S. government in July 1963, the sanctions were supposed to isolate the Cuban government economically and deprive it of U.S. dollars.

The embargo prohibits all but a few U.S. exports to Cuba, prohibits imports from Cuba and limits travel from the U.S. to Cuba. Politicians predicted the embargo would drive Castro to his knees. No such luck.

It's time for the president and Congress to admit the embargo has failed. It has impoverished innocent Cubans, angered U.S. allies, helped forge a relationship between Cuba and Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez and bolstered Castro's anti-American propaganda. It appears now that illness, not the embargo, has laid Castro low.

A dose of American benevolence could foster healthy relations with Cuba's people.

Lift the embargo.


Posted by: usambcuba | August 14, 2006 at 09:52 AM

Ambassador, it seems that logic always permeates more at cooler temperatures....

Fidel is dead....all the signs are there.

Now it's time for us to come to our senses....

Posted by: a different thought | August 14, 2006 at 11:51 AM

It has always been time to come to our senses.

Policies motivated by hatred, vengeance, greed, and foolish pride/stupidity have hurt us and the Cuban people, not Castro.

A bitter harvest of what the community in Miami has sewn is coming -- isolation is a wasteland.

Posted by: usambcuba | August 14, 2006 at 12:44 PM

Ambassador, after Castro is confirmed dead and if it were to happen that embargo restrictions were lifted Post-Castro, and the world witnessed a gradual and peaceful transition to democracy, please do not declare that you were right along. B/c the truth of the matter is that now may be the right time to consider a change in the embargo policy b/c it may work now, but realize that at no time under Castro's control would it have been feasible.

It may not even be prudent to negotitate that with his brother either, but Raul taking over a post-Castro Cuba is not a foregone conclusion.


Posted by: Professor | August 14, 2006 at 01:44 PM

The tapes of a recent conversation between air traffic control at Marti International and an undisclosed location...

ATC: Comandante (cough)... eh, interino... el avion presidencial de Venezuela, Hugo1, ha entrado nuestro espacio aereo y esta pidiendo autorizacion de aterrizaje...

UL: Me cago en sebastopolo! Que cojones querra el comemierda gorila este ahora? No basta que le ha puesto la cola al papalote con sus declaraciones a la prensa? Ahora quiere venir a joderme la vida en persona...

ATC:(muffled, then stifled laughter)... umm, ahem, ehhh, como quiere proceder, Comandante... interino?

UL: (under his breath, bearly audible...) Imaginate, ya es muy tarde ordenar a la fuerza aerea que tumbe el avion accidentalmente, como en el caso de los Hermanos...

ATC: Repita por favor... Su transmision no se pudo entender, favor repetir, cambio...

UL: enhh... (cough)(hack), aahhh, ehh, momento... ya pusieron a Hugo1 en patron circular, esperando autorizacion?

ATC: Claro, Comandante...interino, aun lleva 45 minutos en espera sobre nuestro espacio, esperando autorizacion, debido a la dificultad en localizarlo a Ud. para recibir ordenes. Tuvimos en fin que movilizar los equipos coreanos de GPS, convenientemente instalados en las epauletas de su uniforme por la G-2...

UL: Basta ya de G-2... y como lo habran hecho? Si los unicos que se acercan a mi uniforme sin tenerlo puesto yo son... ehh, ahhh, y que tiempo le queda de vuelo al Hugo1 en terminos de combustible, cambio?

ATC: Hugo1 reporta unas reservas de combustibles indeterminadas, pero confian que sobran para lo que se necesite... Aun reclaman de Hugo1 que se apresuren en autorizar el aterrizaje lo antes posible, pues el Presidente Chavez tiene citada una conferencia de prensa para divulgar mas detalles intimos sobre el caso medico de nuestro Comandante... en banquillo, mas en la tarde...

UL: Pues que se esperen, coño! Aqui llega el pendejo Huguito, SIN SER INVITADO, a joderme la vida, y yo en bata de casa, pues aun no me han terminado de planchar los calzones... lo que no haria por buen palo de HAVANA Club, pero desde que los Bacardi nos robaron la marca en esas cortes de kanguro capitalistas, he tenido solo los litros de Matusalem que me trae Aruca del "dutifri" en Nassau... Porque ni a Vilma le dan descuento esos maricones de la Bacardi..

ATC: ehhh, ok. ahhh... Esperando sus ordenes, Comandante....interino...cambio?

UL: Ven aca, y que proposito dio Hugo1 por su presencia inesperada?

ATC: Se menciono algo de querer confirmar por si mismo la situacion, debido a la escasez de informacion obtenible por los medios de comunicacion mas formales... El Presidente Chavez parece haber sentido que, si hubieraa algo que ocultarle al mundo, seguramente que el, como heredero ideologico de la revolucion anti- EE.UU. latinoamericana, no era de aquellos que tuviera que permanecer fuera ni de los detalles mas delicados...

UL: Pero, sera posible? Que parte de soverania, y seguridad nacional es la que no entiende el indio putumayo este? Tal vez pensara que va hacerse presidente de Cuba tambien...

ATC: Bueno, Comandante....interino... si se hablase en principios bolivarianos, hasta algunos propuestos en teoria por el apostol Marti mismo...

Posted by: nonee moose | August 14, 2006 at 03:07 PM

Okay, I was the pictures, I was wrong... it looks like Fidel is clingling on to life after all, but rpobably not for very long. He looks feeble and sick, I guess Communism didn't find the cure for aging after all.

Posted by: a different thought | August 15, 2006 at 01:33 PM

Okay, I saw the pictures, I was wrong... it looks like Fidel is clingling on to life after all, but rpobably not for very long. He looks feeble and sick, I guess Communism didn't find the cure for aging after all.

Posted by: a different thought | August 15, 2006 at 01:33 PM

Oscar, we need those Fidel articles! We are missing out on a lot of fun!

Castro still looks like crap. I bet you he's in a private hospital room in South Miami somewhere....

Posted by: a thought... | August 15, 2006 at 01:55 PM

Castro still looks like crap. I bet you he's in a private hospital room in South Miami somewhere....

How funny would that be...If that were true, I think Manuel A. Tellechea would walk in to that room himself and put a bullet in Fidel's big coconut head.

Posted by: Professor | August 15, 2006 at 02:17 PM

Oscar:

Well, Fidel has now been seen (supposedly) and so has Raul. It's only Oscar who's still missing in action.

Are the Cuban-American kids still gathering at the beach for their protest? It's been 12 days. Are they setting a Guinness record?

Time for a change of topic.

Desperately.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 15, 2006 at 02:18 PM

We all now know Fidel is still around!! Maybe it was all just a set-up!!They created all that commotion to see the reaction of the Cuban people here. Boy it sadden my heart to see that man on televison last nite. I believe an eye for and eye.. He is a sorry bastard and i wish him the same misery he cause my family..

Posted by: Cuban American!!!! | August 15, 2006 at 03:06 PM

you know, several of us have joked that louJIF had something to do with all this... all this chain-yanking in La Habana has the smell of peanut butter...

Posted by: nonee moose | August 15, 2006 at 03:26 PM

Long live John! He is sticking peanut butter in Castro's IV as we speak...or write...whatever.

John is a true American hero...like G.I. Joe.

Posted by: a thought... | August 15, 2006 at 03:35 PM

I think John may have defected. Perhaps not to Cuba. Maybe some obscure place like Paraguay. It doesn't matter. It's all the same to him.

Posted by: Manuel A. Tellechea | August 15, 2006 at 09:10 PM


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Fantomas said...

also manuel remember our handle names were secuestrados there for a long time..a lot of people were posting under pee wee and it was not me... same happened with longjonny..somebody tried to kill the blog but we all know that oscar left it unnatended for a long peiord of time...por eso te critique el sabado por la noche ucuando no pusistes respeto y moderacion en tu blog

Fantomas said...

Bueno ya que realmente ustedes me han Botado de su casa solo les quiero decir algo y presten atencion...

GraCIAS POR HABERME permitido ser parte de esta nueva experiencia en este blog. I was alwyas received with warm affection by all of you

thanks again...

Fantomas cumplio su mision aqui..Alex bro no tengo nada en contra de usted como usted piensa ..Recuerde bien quien fue el que empezo todo esto con ataques publicos en los blogs..tu puedes estar seguro que no fui yo..

A partir de ahora you lose a client here Manny,,, peleen entre ustedes do whatever you do very well attack your fellow cuban bloggers...

i will not comeback here to defend myself so go ahead and help yorselves...

If you ever want to get in touch with me via comments you know that everyone of you is welcome in my blog to comment. Manolito ahora te toca a ti ir alla y dejarme losmensajes si asi desean ..de esa manera maybe you can help me with my ratings que son bien bajitos. iam only getting 11 visits a day ..and that is pathetic..I need to work more on my blog to make it better.. no le estoy dedicando mucho tiempo a mis posts... because i was spending too much time at rcba

so farewell , gracias mil los veo at

www.abajofidel.blogspot.com

this is the END OF THIS THREAD AND THIS SUBJECT QUE SE VA CON LA CABEZA EN ALTO Y CON LA CABILLA ANDANDO

NUFF SAID

Vana said...

Que descarga caballero, nadie te boto, pero largate de todas maneras

monica bill said...

Thanks for good information