Thursday, July 31, 2008

Honoring the Revolution's "Martyrs"

July 30th, the anniversary of the death in 1957 of Frank País, Cuba's most sanguinary terrorist, is commemorated in Castro's demesne as "Revolutionary Martyrs Day." The focus of memorial activities this year is Frank País' successor, who also had the good grace to get himself killed before the triumph of the Revolution and so earned Castro's eternal gratitude and friendship. This is something that Castro never awards to the living and the only way to earn it is to die. If Castro never actually said it he has certainly made it a guiding principle of his life: The only good revolutionary is a dead revolutionary.

They may not be competent to do anything else but Communists certainly are good at hagiography. They unveiled today in Santiago yet another monument to one of their revolutionary "martyrs." This time the honoree was René Ramos Latour, called by Castro "a commander in both hills and plains," by which he means that Ramos Latour did not confine his terrorist activity to just the cities but even took sabbaticals in the mountains with Fidel. It was there, 50 years ago, that he became one of the less than 100 rebels who were killed in combat there during the Revolution. With so few casualties they might as well save time and money by erecting a whole complex of statues to their "martyrs." It would make a fine site for bowling with tractors some day.

55 comments:

Fantomas said...

July 30th, the anniversary of the death in 1957 of Frank País, Cuba's most sanguinary terrorist

When it comes to Cuban Martyrs TU ERES UN TREMENDO ANALFABETO

YOU KNOW SHIT BOUT FRANK

Fantomas said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNENTZCY2DU

Manuel A.Tellechea said...

fantomas:

If one of Frank País' bombs had killed your mother or a sibling, would you still feel that he was a "hero?" Because his bombs were always left in public places where only civilians could be injured.

Fantomas said...

Primeramente el asociar a Frank con el fidel que conocemos hoy ( comunista) es un grave error. Frank no lucho para establecer ningun regime dictatorial ni mucho menos comunista. Esto es para empezar. Frank Pais lucho para derrocar una dictadura no para tumbar un gobierno democratico. quizas si tu batista no hubiese dado el golpe frank no hubiese tomado las armas y la via violenta

Fantomas said...

If one of Frank País' bombs had killed your mother or a sibling, would you still feel that he was a "hero?"

La policia batistiana era represiva y bruta . Mataron a miles de personas, eran corruptos , practicaban terrorismo de estado, si eras enemigos de ellos , eras candidato a ser torturado and not have due process

Vana said...

Manuel:

I'm glad you coined the phrase Fidelistas sin Fidel, for is clear to me fantomas is one of them, any one who plants bombs in a place where civilians frequent is a terrorist in my book, if Fidel considers him a martyr then he's doubly so, the bombs Pais set he did for the revolution to help Fidel achive his goal.


Let's set a date for bowling with tractors in a free Cuba.

Vana said...

BTW the most brutal police of all time operates in Cuba nowadays, they are there to make sure "the new man" does not stray.

Fantomas said...

the bombs Pais set he did for the revolution to help Fidel achive his goal.


Vana eres la personas mas bruta que he conocido en el tema cubano de 1956 a 1960 NADIE ABSOLUTAMENTE NADIE HABLABA A PUERTAS ABIERTA SQUE LA LUCHA CONTRA BATISTA ERA UNA LUCHA DE FIDEL UNIPERSONAL PARA ESTABLECER EL COMUNISMO EN CUBA ..
RECUERDA QUE FIDEL CASTRO TRAICIONO A UN PUEBLO ENTERO INCLUYENDO A SUS MEJORES AMIGOS DE LUCHA , FRAN , CAMILO, CHE , HUBER Y MUCHOS MAS

Fantomas said...

pero tu eras una niña de 8 -10 años en esa epoca , poco debes saber de esto cuando jugabas con muñecas en la habana

Ms Calabaza said...

"the bombs Pais set he did for the revolution to help Fidel achive his goal."

~ so then, I guess you're saying the ends justifies the means, huh? That would make us no better than your common suicide bomber ... anyone who knowingly kills civilians is a terrorist in my book. I don't know squat about Frank Pais (I'd like to know more) but if he did these things ... he is no hero.

Centurion said...

Primeramente el asociar a Frank con el fidel que conocemos hoy ( comunista) es un grave error. Frank no lucho para establecer ningun regime dictatorial ni mucho menos comunista. Esto es para empezar. Frank Pais lucho para derrocar una dictadura no para tumbar un gobierno democratico. quizas si tu batista no hubiese dado el golpe frank no hubiese tomado las armas y la via violenta

Señor Fantomas usted esta en lo correcto, no se deje provocar por la analfabeta Vana y por el batistiano Manuel

Centurion said...

Fantomas , Frank Pais tenia 23 años solamente cuando muere asesinado por la policia Batistiana

Manuel A.Tellechea said...

fantomas:

If Castro's closest associates did not realize that he was a Communist, then they weren't paying attention or just didn't care.

No one knows what Frank País would have done if he had lived to see the triumph of the Revolution. All we know about him for sure is that he had a depraved indifference to human life and waged his "battles" against non-combatants. Valeriano Weyler did something similar to the pacíficos.

Fantomas said...

No voy a perder mi tiempo discutiendo estupideces contigo

Me retiro de este blog

Eres un tremendo Analfabeta del tema cubano

Dudo que seas cubano

Manuel A.Tellechea said...

fantomas:

This youth of 23 years managed in his brief time on earth to do a lifetime's worth of killing.

Manuel A.Tellechea said...

fantomas:

If it were up to you we wouldn't have to change history books in Cuba since Castro's heroes are still your heroes and Castro's enemies your enemies.

Centurion said...

No voy a perder mi tiempo discutiendo estupideces contigo

Me retiro de este blog

Eres un tremendo Analfabeta del tema cubano

Dudo que seas cubano

Tal parece que fantomas se marcha de este Blog. Es una pena que esto ocurra. Señor Manuel podra usted hacer algo para que la partida de fantomas no sea definitiva. No se moleste en responderme en ingles ya que prefiero el idioma de los cubanos el que se habla dentro de la isla y en la diaspora

Angel Garzón said...

Manuel, many members of our Cuban community in exile still cling on to the long ago debunked myth, that the castro led revolution and most if not all of its supporters had no intentions of establishing a Communist or even a Socialist system in Cuba, the facts clearly indicate that the Marxist nature of castro's ideology was a dead giveaway, had the revolution been conducted and mainly supported by the poor, some of the excuses would have had some validity, but the bottom line is that the majority of its supporters were from affluent circles and the burgeoning middle-class, hence we must deduce and it has been amply confirmed that they were educated, therefore, there are no valid excuses that could and should justify the perpetuation of a long ago debunked mythology.

The main supporters of the castro led revolution deceived themselves into believing that they were going to be able to get away with allowing the Fidelistas to do the dirty and violent work necessary to topple the "negro" that they despised, and later they would have executed their plans for getting rid of the Fidelistas either indirectly or directly once their goals had been accomplished, reminiscent of the way in which Adolf Hitler had done away with Ernst Röhm and his S.A. (Brown Shirts - Storm Troopers) during the "Night of the Long Knives" in 1934, these Cuban plotters neglected to take note of the fact that castro had been an ardent admirer of Hitler and the "National Socialist German Workers' Party" or NAZI Party, fidel used to carry Hitler's "Mein Kampf" with him in earlier years and was very well aware of what had been done in Germany to the S.A., fifo was not about to allow himself to become another Röhm.

Pretending that all of the evidence against their myth does not exist or is not valid, is just another way in which they try to rewrite history, something that their former hero is well known for, perhaps they don't mind emulating castro and expect the rest of us to follow his and their failed lead and ideological blunders.

Fantomas said...

During the next few hours Babalu blog will record its 3 millionth visit on our site meter. Our site metrics have never been a mystery. There's a button in the side bar that you can click to know exactly how much traffic we have and where it is coming from.

To mark the occasion we've asked our contributors to write a note of thanks to you, our readers. Some of you come infrequently, some visit several times a day and others are addicted. Regardless we're very thankful that you decide to share a bit of your time with us...

I’m sitting here trying to put my thoughts into words as Babalu approaches the 3 million unique visitor mark and it’s no easy task, let me tell you. The past five years – sheesh, I can’t even believe it’s been five years already – have been pretty incredible. We have, together, run the gamut of emotions. We’ve had tears of joy and tears of pain. We’ve had tears come just because they came. I can’t count the number of times I’ve sat here in front of my computer shedding tears simply because I happen to have been born Cuban.
Yes, folks. The tears have been many. And I know it may sound corny, but I truly believe – I truly hope – that each tear we have shed hasn’t been in vain. I hope that we have managed to somehow make a difference. I believe we’ve brought a few truths to light. I believe we’ve opened some eyes to the reality of Cuba.

I know sometimes it seems like our efforts fall short, but some walls can’t be taken down by bulldozers. Some walls need to come down brick by brick. And every day that there exists a place like Babalu and all the other great Cubiche blogs out there, we are chiseling and pulling bricks from the walls that keep Cuba in bondage. I truly, truly believe that.

There are people toiling out there, though, doing their darndest to lay those bricks we’ve managed to take down back on that wall. Yet I feel and overwhelming pride in the fact that there are a whole heckofa lot of people right now alongside us pulling bricks. All you need to do is look at that blogroll on the sidebar, which has grown almost exponentially over the years, and then look that the blogrolls of each to know that we aren’t just out here por amor al arte.

I don’t know if any or all of our efforts will actually have any impact in bringing change to Cuba, but I, like all of you I’m sure, am willing to stick around and fight the fight. I’m willing to hang out here in the trenches with you all for as long as it takes.

And I know I won’t be alone in these trenches because you are all here and no one, no one, made you jump into this fray. No one ordered you into battle. You came of your own volition. You fight because of your convictions and arm yourselves with what you deem is right and just and true.

Three million unique visitors may not seem like such an incredible milestone in blog terms – there are, after all, blogs out there that get millions of hits per day - but Cuba is a subject not many people want to talk about. Cuba isn’t something that’s on everybody’s mind all the time. It is, like we are on the net, just a small island. But, and I don’t want to sound arrogant and I certainly don’t want anyone criticizing the following as hubris, but I truly believe that we – not just Babalu but the entire spectrum of Cuban bloggers – are the voice of that muted island. Cuba speaks to the world through us, through Generacion y, Penultimos Dias, and The Real Cuba, Babalu and so many others.

So, before I get any more melodramatic and wishy washy, I want to say thanks. It’s been an incredible ride so far.

A huge shout out to the Babalu crew: What incredibly beautiful people you are and what an amazing, intelligent, talented and dedicated bunch you are. It is my utmost honor and privilege to count you all as family.

And to those of you that come by from time to time, that swing by here every once in a while and read, comment, chat, argue, discuss, debate, question, and toss in your two cents worth: I am forever grateful. Without you, there would be no Babalu. It’s your visits that make this humble blog not just one of the best, but a warm, loving home.

"It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people's minds." -Samuel Adams

-Val Prieto, Founding editor


This “humble little blog”, as Val likes to call it, is about to reach a grand milestone: 3 million hits. That’s quite a feat for a little blog. This little island on the ‘net wouldn’t have reached that point without you, the reader. In all, there are 16 contributors to this blog. Some write more, some write less, all of us writing with the same love and conviction, but those words would just be echoes if you were not on the other end reading them. So I’d like to thank you from the bottom of my heart for coming by. Whether you pop in once a week, once a day, or every chance you get, just know that the site-meter keeps on going, upwards and onwards, and it is all made worthwhile, because of you.

-Amanda


Anyone who writes, no matter how infrequently, craves attention -- and maybe a little immortality. After all, words are still being read today that were written by a blind poet three thousand years ago. All of us write for ourselves, of course. Most of us have more stuff unpublished than published. We are a virulently self-critical lot, writers. But in reality, we write for you. Without the reader the writer's craft is just an echo chamber of the writer's mind.

On the occasion of our 3,000,000th visit, we take stock and realize that without you, constant reader, the fan, this would not be possible. You are the reason we write. All of you take what we give you and pass it along, digest it, analyze it, agree or disagree with it, yell at it, nod your head with it, shake a fist at it. It's all good. Without you, our existence would be meaningless.

Thank you for taking the dream of one person and turning it into a daily adventure where our ultimate goal is truth and justice for an oppressed people ninety miles away, and for all oppressed people around the world. Without you this would be nothing but gaslight.

Thank you, reader, for making this blog what it is.

George L. Moneo


There’s a word in Spanish that we exiles use to describe our situation, “destierro.” Literally, it means to have been stripped of your earth, “tierra” - No home, no country.

As a young “desterrado,” I drifted further and further away from my earth, purposely avoiding the currents that lead back to it. I decided to pretend my home had sunk like the mythical Atlantis. Yet, I still drifted.

While drifting, one day, I came upon on Island from where you could see that earth that had been stripped from me. The people on that island all worked to help others understand the plight of desterrados and fought for those, who although had not been stripped of their earth, had been stripped of their humanity.

Eventually, I came to belong in that island oasis on the net without a bearded dictator. It’s an honor to be associated with people who selflessly give of themselves to ensure that other drifters and desterrados have a place to stop and admire our “tierra,” if only from afar.

Incredibly, the island has been visited three million times. I hope that at the very least, each visit caused someone to reflect on Cuba. I know I always look forward to pulling up to the Babalú island as I hope you do too. God Bless.

-Reinier Potts


I Got Hooked. I started reading Babalú a few years ago as a result of a Google search for “Cuba news.” From day one, I was hooked. The writing was always wonderful, sometimes provocative, but for the most part compelling. But the comments! There were people out there reading and caring and giving their opinions on what had been written. I loved the forum and the format. And like I said, I was hooked.

I confess that I lurked for over a year. I would come to Babalú first thing in the morning with my cafécito to get the news and to be entertained. I gave up my beloved newspaper for this better, more expansive, and much more interesting media. I was never disappointed.

While I loved reading the news aspect of it, I was always drawn in by the personal stories. The human drama, if you will. It was at this point that I started writing my own blog, My Big, Fat, Cuban Family. It was a perfect ying to the Babalú yang. I began writing about Cuban-American life and about how we Cubans try (and succeed) to maintain our cultural identity. I posted recipes and talked about my family and our idiomatic ways. When Val asked me to become a contributor to Babalú, I was so honored! But I also felt like this was the obvious next step for me. I love Cubans. I love being Cuban. I love our idiosyncratic Cubanisms. And I especially love Cuban families.

I confess that posting recipes every two weeks is a bit of a challenge for me, self-imposed of course, but still there. Because I decided my posts would be personal and that I would actually cook and take pictures and do step-by-step instructions instead of just posting recipes. The cooking feature was a hit in my home, which I expected, but the real surprise came when I started getting, not just comments, but mail.

Yes, I got mail. Lots of mail. Some had questions about how to make a certain recipe. Some had comments. But all had stories. THAT is when I was seriously hooked. I get to hear people’s stories. Stories that usually revolve around the heart of the Cuban home – the kitchen.

I get to hear about how Tia Conchita made the perfect croquetas and would I know how make those? I get to hear about how their moms would improvise in the kitchen after their exilio. I get to hear about how much they miss their abuelita. And I laugh and I cry and I marvel at what an amazing Cuban community has been brought together online. And I am oh-so-grateful to be able, not just to cook and post recipes, but to share life. To share Cuban-American life.

So thank you, not just to Babalú for being The-Best-Must-Read-Cuban-Blog-On-The-Web, but to you faithful readers who have given this “island on the web” such a beautiful Cuban-American face.

Oh yes, and thanks for trusting me with your lives. =D

Besos,

-Marta “La Cocinera” Darby


My fellow infidels. I’m taking a break from trial preparation to congratulate Babalu for 3 million visitors and especially want to thank Henry and Val for bringing me on board. I really enjoy being able to post my treatises and political and economic rants plus an occasional photo from the SW or the Obama Girl.

I also want to thank those that have taken the time to read my esoteric posts and who have engaged in civilized and educational dialogue. I’d like to say that I’ve tried to stick to serious issues rather than the typical lefty arguments like: “My candidate is better looking than yours and can shoot a 3 point shot.”

Can you believe that 3 million number? That’s more than the population of Miami Dade County.

So as we reach the milestone here I am toasting all of you with a shot of Café Cubano! Cheers!



“Cigar Mike” Pancier


Congratulations to my fellow contributors, and to our readers. Your readership, your loyalty and your own contributions, not a mere number, are the truest measure of our success.

I devote a lot of what I write here and at my own blog to the plight of Cuban political prisoners and other dissidents on the island. The best thing readers could do on their behalf is to learn their stories, and to share them with your families, friends, co-workers, etc. Do not let them be forgotten. Be their voice, and be the voice for the hopes and dreams of a free Cuba.

-Marc Masferrer


I don’t usually write about myself, I prefer to stay on topic, Cuba. However, if you’ve met Marta, you know that she has a knack of making your tongue wag. You babble and tell her things you haven’t even thought about, let alone shared with anyone, for years—she’s a very talented woman. She asked me how I wound up getting involved with a bunch of Cubans, and then urged me to share. Okay Marta, here goes.

When I first found my way to Babalu a number of years ago, it was a much smaller island on the net than we are today. Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that I would become a blogger and contributing writer here at Babalu.

Right from the beginning, I felt at home here, serendipity you might say, because even though I’m not Cuban, I too have a Cuban story. In fact several Cuban stories, to me they are a large golden ribbon woven among the threads of my life.

I don’t want to bore you with long details, so here is one of them, the first.

I was once a very frightened small girl, for a good reason; my Mother left my Father and our home, and moved us from San Franciso to Los Angeles. There was no money, she was working long hours from early morning until late. A family who was a friend of someone Mom knew took us in. I remember feeling lost and panicked, everything was strange. From the very first day, the lady of the house made me one of her own; she went out of her way to comfort and to reassure; and thanks to her loving kindness, I was made to feel safe and secure in spite of the uncertainty of our situation. I remember her hugs, her smiles, her kindness, and one day over fifty years later, tasting was to be my first Cuban meal, I remembered a smell, and then I remembered sitting at her kitchen table eating black beans and yellow rice.

Within a few months, things improved, and we moved on, and as children do, I didn’t think much about those difficult days, or my dark haired temporary mother, and Mom never understood why I love beans and rice, because she never served them. :)

Therefore, in honor of Babalu’s odometer turning over the 3 million mark, I like to thank each one of our readers for making this not just an island, but also a home on the net. We wouldn’t be here without you. One of these days, there will be a Babalu reunion 90 miles south, in a beautiful, prosperous and free Cuba.

-Ziva

How I met Babalu: I was watching Hardball, back before Chris Matthews took a left turn off the reservation and developed neurological symptoms at the timbre of Obama’s voice. In the middle of an interview, the topic of the Bay of Pigs came up. Matthews was dismissive, saying more or less, “Oh, yeah, and that’s when the rest of the country was going to rise up and revolt. We know they didn’t.” It was all I could do not to throw something at the TV. Oh, yeah, I thought to myself, the rest of the country, those who weren’t rounded up beforehand and had access to the information, could hear all about the brigade being torn to shreds after having been left in the lurch by your sainted JFK. I emailed him, of course, which probably increased the amount of scrap paper around the studio.

The frustration was palpable. No one was out there countering the misconceptions, the lies. The oppression and misery of the Cuban people had been forgotten or worse yet, consciously hidden. As the history receded, so did the truth. There seemed to be no way to get the information out. Then my brother tipped me to Babalublog. Here were Cuban Americans on their own platform taking on the MSM in fluent English, as well as having a bit of fun with our shared culture. Here was an English language format that made it that much harder to dismiss.

On a more personal level, I wasn’t alone in my anger, frustration, and even cultural identity because Babalu gave it voice, as it gives voice to that of many others. So as Babalu passes the 3 million mark, it is more than anything else an ever expanding group of people- posters and commenters alike- who rail, and laugh, and argue. After all, we are family. Most importantly, however, we are united in one goal: Cambio!

-Ruth


I became the “token” Italian-American contributing writer at Babalu in February when Val said he wanted me to have a set of keys to the blog. It came as a surprise to me that he would consider my non-Cuban voice important enough to speak on Babalú but I was honored to accept the invitation.

I don’t have any inspirational, personal anecdotes about life in Cuba and thankfully, no painful stories about my family having to leave their life behind. I just have what I call "second-hand" pain that I feel when I hear and read these stories from Cubans, and it always ends up making me angry enough to write something.

In the year and a half I have been blogging about Cuba, and the six months I have been with Babalu, it never ceases to bring a tear to my eye when a Cuban I don’t know emails me or adds a comment thanking me for taking up the Cuban cause. I’m sentimental and I have printed every one of the beautiful emails I have received and I read them when I don’t feel like blogging or talking up the cause anymore, which happens from time to time. I get inspired all over again because these are the people who give me courage to stand up for a free Cuba when other non-Cubans don’t care about it. These are the people who are so grateful that someone who is not one of their own has seen the light that they take the time to email a perfect stranger. These are the readers who have made Babalu the most widely-read blog about Cuba on the internet, and who have, in turn, included me into their gigantic Cuban family and made me feel welcome. I am proud to know Val, a man who stands up for what he believes in and does not waiver in his convictions, the other writers here, and to be a part of Babalú as it reaches the three million-visitor mark.

-Claudia Fanelli


Just like my Babalu colleagues I am very appreciative of you, the readers of this blog. I wanted to specifically recognize those readers who not only visit us regularly and comment but also those who have gone from a passive posture to an active one and supported our BUCL.org campaigns in the past. We put together BUCL as a way to involve different bloggers and take our activism from the online to the real world. We successfully carried messages about the real Cuba into the mainstream media. First we called attention to the complicity of Spanish businesses with the castro regime. Then we pointed out the hypocrisy of an alleged human rights champion (Sting, the lead singer of The Police) who vacations in Cuba and was planning a state-sponsored concert there. The concert never happened. In out third campaign we gave monetary and promotional support to the dissidence in Cuba. And none of it could have happened if readers had not stepped in and sponsored the campaigns in addition to our fellow bloggers.

Whenever we’ve had a petition or asked for your help in getting some item of Che Guevara paraphernalia off of local store shelves you’ve been there.

For all of that and more, I offer my heartiest and most sincere thanks.

Henry Gomez, Managing Editor



Posted by Henry Louis Gomez at 05:18 PM | Permanent Link to this Post | Habla (1)

Fulano de Cal said...

"Esto es para empezar. Frank Pais lucho para derrocar una dictadura no para tumbar un gobierno democratico."

Bueno, entonces tambien Eduardo Arocena es un heroe. In free Cuba, he will be regarded as a hero. No Fantomoas, tu eres el hipocrita mas grande del mundo. Pray Eduardo is pardoned by Bush.

Fantomas said...

Eduardo Arocena es un criminal comun, asesino y narcotraficante no debe ser perdonado por Bush

Fantomas said...

Ademas Recuerde que los crimenes cometidos por Arocena no fueron cometidos en suelo cubano . Esos crimenes fueron cometids en EEUU violando de esa manera todas la leyes existentes en este pais y aun siendo advertidos continuaron con sus crimenes . Ud es el hipocrita fulano de cal

Manuel A.Tellechea said...

Angel:

You could not be more right. There is nothing that can be salvaged from that patricidal enterprise known as the Cuban Revolution.

The important thing to remember is that the character of the Revolution, if not its slogans, did not change after Jan. 1, 1959.

It was always controlled by vicious and cowardly psychopaths whose only objective was to enslave the Cuban people and destroy all our democratic traditions. If decent men ever formed part of it, they stepped aside rather than oppose it.

The firing squads were in operation in the Sierra long before they were transferred to La Cabaña.

The same contempt for the Rule of Law and the most basic precepts of humanity, the same arbitrary and capricious conduct, the same rapacity and bloodlust, characterized the rebels' struggle for power from beginning to end.

It cannot, therefore, surprise anyone that the Revolution once triumphant should continue doing to the country what it had been doing all along.

It is impossible to separate the Cuban Revolution from Fidel Castro. It is his acts, first and foremost, that define it. That apocryphal revolution without Fidel was never fought. The real revolution, the only revolution, is saturated with his malignant spirit. However many curtains one hangs to conceal his figure, his presence cannot be erased.

Anyone who tries to defend the Cuban Revolution cannot avoid justifying Fidel Castro's actions; for there are not two Fidels just as there are not two revolutions.

Fantomas said...

Anyone who tries to defend the Cuban Revolution cannot avoid justifying Fidel Castro's actions; for there are not two Fidels just as there are not two revolutions.

The revolution was meant to topple Batista . A dictator that was the enemy of the cuban People after the March 10 golpe de estado.

Manuel A.Tellechea said...

fantomas:

Unleashing a dragon to kill a fly is always a good idea, isn't it?

Vana said...

Manuel:

Please send all cut and paste to The Madhouse, fantomas loves it even in his blog, why does he have to shove it down our throats.

merengue said...

vana,

Fantomas es lo mas arrastrado que yo he visto en mi vida. To the madhouse loser.

Angel Garzón said...

When a commentator says that "The revolution was meant to topple Batista . A dictator that was the enemy of the cuban People after the March 10 golpe de estado." that individual must understand, or at the very least make an effort to try to understand, that such statement implies that all the criminal actions and activities of the revolutionaries matter not because as the communists are fond of saying, the end justifies the means, such a belief is even more depraved and damaging than relativism, which is partly a component of the concept, relativism allows individuals to decide whether or not to follow or believe in rules of law and norms of behavior, and while I am somewhat of a libertarian who believes that many of the complexities of life are indeed within the confines of what is commonly known as "a grey area" I also support the rule of law and oppose anarchy, by the commentators barometer we are all absolved of any culpability if we choose to kill someone because that person is a dimwitted pest who constantly insults those with whom he disagrees and chooses to demean every woman he runs into in the blogosphere.

Jiminy Cricket III said...

BREAKING NEWS! A new picture of Fantomas has been discovered!

Link:

http://www.ananova.com/images/web/1389014.jpg

Vana said...

Merengue:

Estoy de acuerdo contigo 100%

Vana said...

Angel:

He seems to think that toppling a dictator to replace him with a bloodier one is a good thing, Fidelista sin Fidel is what he is.

Angel Garzón said...

Vana, by his standard, you may choose to kill him and you'd bare no culpability, nor would you be prosecuted. Humm!!! point to ponder?

Vana said...

Angel:

Big point to ponder indeed! his standards are those of a psycho.

Fantomas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Fantomas said...

Ok Manuel a partir de ahora te voy a llamar esbirro batistiano sin batista . Batista se revuelve en la tumba cada vez que tu lo mencionas

Angel Garzón said...

Vana said..."...his standards are those of a psycho."

Or as Manuel would probably call it, the standards of a Fidelista sin Fidel. I would classify it as infiltrado.

Manuel A.Tellechea said...

angel:

It is interesting that you should have mentioned anarchy, because it was 19th century Spanish anarchists who introduced Cubans to dynamite as an agent of political change. The attempt to blow up the Captain General's residence in the War of 1895 as well as the plot to incinerate Machado and his entire cabinet during Clemente Bello's funeral in 1932 (assassinated expressly for that purpose) are two well-known examples. Note that, in both cases, the bombs were not placed indiscriminately but intended to achieve a political objective.

In the 1959 Revolution bombs superceded all other methods of warfare. The bombs were not used against political targets but against the civilian population.

The Castroites were not making war on Batista -- in fact, they officiously avoided military targets after Moncada -- but on non-belligerants.

Still, the anarchist tradition largely shielded the 26th of July Movement from criticism and enabled a large segment of the population to view their activities as legitimate and the bombers themselves as "heroes."

Nowadays, of course, militants who do what they did 50 years ago are considered terrorists in the Western World.

This should make it more difficult today for the fidelistas and the fidelistas sin fidel to defend the actions of Frank País and his cohorts as legitimate warfare.

Nevertheless, not only do they continue to glorify these murderers, but, with their usual hypocrisy, condemn as "terrorists" those who employ the same methods against them.

Manuel A.Tellechea said...

fantomas:

"Esbirros" is what the fidelistas called those who tried to stop them from placing their bombs.

Fulano de Cal said...

Fantomas, is it fair to say that if placed in a room alone with Fidel, on US soil, you would not break any laws?

Fantomas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jiminy Cricket III said...

This proves Fantomas is Goofy!

Fantomas said...

Goofy is the one asking the question, I'm a consumate and relentless Cuban freedom fighter

Fantomas said...

Fantomas, is it fair to say that if placed in a room alone with Fidel, on US soil, you would not break any laws?

Pensandolo bien despues de afeitarlo, y antes de llevarmelo para disney le romperia la cabeza con un sarten y una olla de presion

Fantomas said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Centurion said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Centurion said...

Regresastes fantomas, ya veo que usted no se puede alejar mucho tiempo de este blog, es como una adiccion

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